SIGNS YOUR HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE IS GOING TO KILL YOU

SIGNS YOUR HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE IS GOING TO KILL YOU

SIGNS YOUR HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE IS GOING TO KILL YOU

By: Meg Dowell 

Many people live with high blood pressure and don’t know they have it. Whether you’re aware of your condition or not, it harms your health over time if it goes untreated. There are many symptoms uncommon in most people with high blood pressure — unless their lives are in immediate danger. Here’s how to tell if your blood pressure is out of control — and what you can do about it.

You’re feeling dizzy

The American Heart Association clarifies that high blood pressure does not frequently cause dizziness. Sometimes, it’s a side effect of certain blood pressure medications. However, sudden dizziness or loss of balance could mean you are having a stroke as a result of high blood pressure. According to the CDC, around 140,000 die of a stroke every year

You’re suffering from constant headaches

There are many different types of headaches, and their root causes vary. According to Harvard Health, headaches may be the only sign of high blood pressure in some people. If you’re suffering persistent headaches and that’s not normal for you, your blood pressure could be to blame. Severe headaches could signal something called a hypertensive crisis — which actually needs immediate medical treatment.

You’re not making an effort to change your habits

If a health professional has given you a list of guidelines to follow to control your high blood pressure, and you aren’t following that list, your life could be in danger. The National Heart, Blood, and Lung Institute warns that not taking charge of your blood pressure can lead to serious complications. These include kidney disease, eye damage, and even devastating damage to your brain.

You can’t control it no matter what you do

Resistant hypertension, or resistant high blood pressure, occurs when your blood pressure levels don’t respond as readily to lifestyle changes and medications as they should. You might have to continue to make behavior changes, try new medications, and monitor your pressures to figure out when they’re at their highest and why. If you don’t put in the extra effort, you’re putting your health at risk.

What happens if you don’t change?

According to Mayo Clinic, chronic, uncontrolled high blood pressure can become life-threatening. Long-term damage to your arteries can put you at risk for an aneurysm. Consistent high readings can also lead to heart disease, heart failure, and increase your risk of having a heart attack. You could also have a stroke or develop dementia.

Is your blood pressure normal?

Doctors interpret your blood pressure using two different numbers. According to the American Heart Association, the top number should read less than 120, and the bottom number should read less than 80. If your blood pressure reads 160 over 100 or higher, you’re at the highest stage of hypertension. Anything higher than 180 over 110 requires immediate medical attention.

Easy changes that can improve blood pressure

Usually, medication and a number of lifestyle changes work together to effectively keep your blood pressure within a safe range. According to Healthline, exercise can make a huge difference — around 150 minutes of moderate activity per week. Limiting your added sugar, alcohol, and processed food intake also helps. Make sure you’re managing your stress and getting enough sleep, too.

8 HABITS THAT ARE BAD FOR YOUR HEART

8 HABITS THAT ARE BAD FOR YOUR HEART

8 HABITS THAT ARE BAD FOR YOUR HEART

  1. You Bank on Your Workout

Do you exercise? That’s great. But if you sit down for most of the rest of your day, that’s a problem. You need to be active all day long. Little bursts count. If you have a desk job, take a short walk every hour to boost your circulation, even if it’s just to your break room and back. Binge-watching your favourite show? Get up and dance, or do push-ups during the commercials.

  1. You Say “I’m Too Young”

Don’t wait to work on keeping your heart healthy. Exercise, eat a healthy diet and know your numbers – blood pressure, cholesterol, and blood sugar.  The ideal time to do your heart a favour is now.

  1. One Drink Too Many

For most people, moderate drinking (one a day for women, up to two daily for men) is OK. A daily drink may even have some benefits for the heart. But more than that can raise levels of certain fats in the blood and blood pressure, too. That’s especially true if you have several drinks at a time. So stick to your daily limit.

  1. You Diss a Good-for-You Diet

You may think it’s going to be all oat bran, all the time. Surprise! There’s no reason for your food to be bland and boring. A Mediterranean-style diet has delicious foods like olive oil, nuts, fruit, whole grains, fish, lean protein, and red wine. It helps keep your heart healthy, thanks to the “good” fats, fibre, and nutrients. Plus, you’ll actually want to stick to this diet because it tastes so good!

  1. You Don’t Know Your Numbers

Pop quiz: What’s your cholesterol level? How about your blood pressure? No clue? That’s risky. They could be too high without you knowing. (You could feel just fine and have high cholesterol or high blood pressure.) So protect yourself. Starting at age 20, get your cholesterol checked every 4 to 6 years.

  1. Waist Not

Belly fat is particularly bad for your heart. So get your tape measure and size up the inches around your waist. It’s a red flag if it’s more than 35 inches around for women or 40 inches for men. Need to slim down? Take it step by step. Even losing a small amount of weight is good for your heart.

  1. You Ignore Your Blues

When you feel low, it’s hard to do things that are good for you, like exercise. If you have felt down for more than a few weeks, talk to your doctor or a mental health professional. Talk therapy, exercise, and medication (if needed) can improve your mood so you have more energy to take care of yourself.

  1. You Blow Off Second-hand Smoke

Someone else’s smoke could hurt your heart and blood vessels. You need to avoid it. If you spend a lot of time with someone who isn’t ready to quit smoking, insist that they at least not smoke around you, whether it’s at home, work, or in your car.  Your tough love may be the nudge they need to kick the habit, which will be good for both of you.

Courtesy: Webmd.com

SIGNS YOUR HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE IS GOING TO KILL YOU

SIGNS YOUR HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE IS GOING TO KILL YOU

SIGNS YOUR HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE IS GOING TO KILL YOU

By: Meg Dowell 

Many people live with high blood pressure and don’t know they have it. Whether you’re aware of your condition or not, it harms your health over time if it goes untreated. There are many symptoms uncommon in most people with high blood pressure — unless their lives are in immediate danger. Here’s how to tell if your blood pressure is out of control — and what you can do about it.

You’re feeling dizzy

The American Heart Association clarifies that high blood pressure does not frequently cause dizziness. Sometimes, it’s a side effect of certain blood pressure medications. However, sudden dizziness or loss of balance could mean you are having a stroke as a result of high blood pressure. According to the CDC, around 140,000 die of a stroke every year

You’re suffering from constant headaches

There are many different types of headaches, and their root causes vary. According to Harvard Health, headaches may be the only sign of high blood pressure in some people. If you’re suffering persistent headaches and that’s not normal for you, your blood pressure could be to blame. Severe headaches could signal something called a hypertensive crisis — which actually needs immediate medical treatment.

You’re not making an effort to change your habits

If a health professional has given you a list of guidelines to follow to control your high blood pressure, and you aren’t following that list, your life could be in danger. The National Heart, Blood, and Lung Institute warns that not taking charge of your blood pressure can lead to serious complications. These include kidney disease, eye damage, and even devastating damage to your brain.

You can’t control it no matter what you do

Resistant hypertension, or resistant high blood pressure, occurs when your blood pressure levels don’t respond as readily to lifestyle changes and medications as they should. You might have to continue to make behavior changes, try new medications, and monitor your pressures to figure out when they’re at their highest and why. If you don’t put in the extra effort, you’re putting your health at risk.

What happens if you don’t change?

According to Mayo Clinic, chronic, uncontrolled high blood pressure can become life-threatening. Long-term damage to your arteries can put you at risk for an aneurysm. Consistent high readings can also lead to heart disease, heart failure, and increase your risk of having a heart attack. You could also have a stroke or develop dementia.

Is your blood pressure normal?

Doctors interpret your blood pressure using two different numbers. According to the American Heart Association, the top number should read less than 120, and the bottom number should read less than 80. If your blood pressure reads 160 over 100 or higher, you’re at the highest stage of hypertension. Anything higher than 180 over 110 requires immediate medical attention.

Easy changes that can improve blood pressure

Usually, medication and a number of lifestyle changes work together to effectively keep your blood pressure within a safe range. According to Healthline, exercise can make a huge difference — around 150 minutes of moderate activity per week. Limiting your added sugar, alcohol, and processed food intake also helps. Make sure you’re managing your stress and getting enough sleep, too.

THE SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS OF HIGH CHOLESTEROL YOU NEED TO WATCH OUT FOR

THE SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS OF HIGH CHOLESTEROL YOU NEED TO WATCH OUT FOR

THE SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS OF HIGH CHOLESTEROL YOU NEED TO WATCH OUT FOR

By:Sheiresa Ngo 

You might know that high cholesterol is not a good thing, but you might not be aware of the impact it can have on your body. If cholesterol levels get out of control, your overall health and quality of life could be significantly affected. However, there are some things you can do to reduce your risk of losing the battle against this health issue. Knowledge is key.

Here are a few things you should know about high cholesterol.

What happens when you have too much cholesterol?

Too much cholesterol, which is a type of fat in your blood, can be very dangerous. If you have too much cholesterol in your blood, it begins to build up in your arteries and can eventually lead to atherosclerosis, which is the hardening of the arteries. Over time, this buildup can cause your arteries to become narrow and make it harder for blood to flow through your arteries. You could also develop blood clots, according to WebMD.

What contributes to high cholesterol?

  • Heredity. There are several causes of high cholesterol. Heredity is one way you could develop elevated cholesterol levels. A condition called familial hypercholesterolemia causes very high LDL cholesterol among family members. The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute says hypercholesterolemia usually begins from the time you are born, and it could lead to a heart attack early in life.
  • Diet. A high-fat diet is a sure way to send your cholesterol levels soaring. Common sources of cholesterol are foods that come from animals, such as meat and cheese. It’s best to limit your intake of saturated fat, which the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute says increases your low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol level more than anything else in your diet.
  • Activity level. If you want to lower your chances of developing high cholesterol, stay active. A sedentary lifestyle is another possible cause. The Department of Health and Human Services suggests that adults get at least 150 minutes of moderate-intensity aerobic activity each week or 75 minutes of vigorous aerobic activity each week. In addition, adults should engage in strength training at least twice a week.

Symptoms

High cholesterol (in addition to high blood pressure) is known as the “silent killer.” This is because you can have high cholesterol levels in your blood and not even know. High cholesterol tends to have no symptoms, which is why it’s important to go for your annual physical. As part of your examination, your doctor will order blood tests. One of the most important is a cholesterol test, which is also called a lipid panel. This test measures the fat levels in your blood. If your doctor doesn’t order this test, just ask.

Risk factors

There are several risk factors for high cholesterol. Risk factors include large waist circumference, smoking, diabetes, age, and gender.

  • Waist circumference. Your risk increases if you are a man with a waist circumference of at least 40 inches or a woman with a waist circumference of at least 35 inches, according to Mayo Clinic.
  • Smoking. Smoking damages the walls of your blood vessels, which can make them more likely to store fatty deposits. In addition, smoking could lower your HDL, or “good,” cholesterol.
  • Diabetes. High blood sugar can result in higher LDL (“bad”) cholesterol and lower HDL (“good”) cholesterol. High blood sugar also damages the lining of your arteries.
  • Age and gender. Men tend to have lower levels of HDL (“good”) cholesterol than women. As women and men get older, their LDL (“bad”) cholesterol levels often increase. Women younger than 55 years old tend to have lower LDL (“bad”) cholesterol levels than men. This changes after 55, when LDL levels for women are usually higher than men.

Complications

Unfortunately, high cholesterol can lead to many complications. Among them are a heart attack, high blood pressure, stroke, chronic kidney disease, and chest pain. Fortunately, high cholesterol and the complications can usually be treated with medications and lifestyle changes. Statins are the most commonly prescribed medications used to treat high cholesterol. Lipitor and Zocor are some examples.

Prevention

There are some ways you can reduce your chances of getting high cholesterol or making your condition worse. You can be proactive and take charge of your health. A healthy diet is one of the best ways to do this. Experts suggest eating a plant-based diet, eating less bad fat and more good fat, and consuming plenty of whole grains. According to Harvard School of Public Health, “Eating whole instead of refined grains substantially lowers total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL, or bad) cholesterol, triglycerides, and insulin levels. Any of these changes would be expected to reduce the risk for cardiovascular disease.

Resources

Educate yourself as much as you can so you can enjoy a healthy life.

 

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